Sunday, September 23, 2007

Podcasts, walks, and taking notes

As well as reading way too many blogs, I've been listening to several podcasts lately. Mostly while walking, as the weather has been so nice. I wish Brother Giles would hurry up with another Secrets of Harry Potter podcast, but I digress. This week, aside from an Emergent Village podcast, I listened to sermons by Tim Keller, Rick McKinley and Mark Driscoll. Yeah, a wee bit of variety there- lol.

This morning I woke up with one of those UberHeadaches that you just know is going to dog you the whole day. After two cups of coffee, two aleve, clarinex and mucinex d didn't do the trick, I went for a walk. Gorgeous day, so I went to the park and my favorite gazebo wall perch, overlooking the bay and sailboats. And listened to podcasts.

Two of the casts I listened to made snarky references to taking notes during sermons. One guy said that most people never read those notes again. That's certainly true in my case. So I started to think about why I take notes. The dude was right, I never look at them again. I can't read my own handwriting half the time anyway, which is why I love the computer. I think it's that doing something while I am listening helps me concentrate.

This is the age of Multitasking. For example, while I'm writing this I'm also watching Stargate Atlantis season three on dvd, and chatting with a friend. Have I mentioned I love my laptop? I can't exactly whip out my computer and chat during church, or walk around for that matter. So, I take notes :)

Sunday, September 16, 2007

Books books books

Tpday's non-writing brought to you by:

GoodReads.

Thanks to pokings from evil friends, I have registered. I will never have the energy to list all the books on my shelves again, but I like the "currently reading" and "to read" shelves, those I may possibly keep updating. Tho now it looks like I have read two books and need to read ten - lol.

Feel free to head on over and friend me there.

Saturday, September 15, 2007

something to think about...

Have been seriously bit by the blog bug. Between importing RSS feeds to my LJ friends list, and now subscribing to many others via bloglines, I've got way too many to read. Was way too much trouble to make links for them all here, so if I have commented on your blog and you don't see it in my links, it doesn't mean I've not subscribed to your feed :)

Here's a bit from Rick McKinley's blog that struck me:

Too often we (the church) think we need to invent and brand everything that we do in the city. This just perpetuates the false shell of our own subculture. Instead look for opportunities that already exist in the city. There are tons of non profits in your town. They are dying for people who will join them in their work. We get to saddle up to people who share Kingdom passion. They may not know it is Kingdom passion because they may not know the King yet. But as you serve them and with them serve others you gain a voice into their lives and they into yours. You also build viability for the Gospel. They begin to trust that you are not going to try to Colonialise their organization and make t-shirts that say “we saved Bob’s aids hospice”.

Thursday, September 13, 2007

Theological World View meme

You scored as Emergent/Postmodern, You are Emergent/Postmodern in your theology. You feel alienated from older forms of church, you don't think they connect to modern culture very well. No one knows the whole truth about God, and we have much to learn from each other, and so learning takes place in dialogue. Evangelism should take place in relationships rather than through crusades and altar-calls. People are interested in spirituality and want to ask questions, so the church should help them to do this.

Emergent/Postmodern

79%

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan

71%

Reformed Evangelical

64%

Neo orthodox

61%

Fundamentalist

57%

Roman Catholic

50%

Modern Liberal

39%

Classical Liberal

36%

Charismatic/Pentecostal

36%

What's your theological worldview?
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Saturday, September 8, 2007

Off the map

Just registered to go to the Off the Map conference in Seattle in November :)

It's sort of a funny story. When I had my lovely trip home from a friend's wedding in April (waves to Larissa), I got a voucher from Jet Blue for the price of my return flight b/c we had a 6 hours delay. Since I'm going to England in Jan and Hungary in July, I figured I needed to use the voucher this fall, and was researching places I was interested in seeing that Jet blue goes to. Had narrowed it down to about four, and after a poll on my LiveJournal (Because such an important decision cannot be made alone), I had decided on Seattle, the first week of November. Figured coffee, hotel with wireless, work on my NaNoWrimo project, and do some sightseeing.

Then I get an email about this conference in Seattle, the first week of November. My Mom: "It's a sign!" Duly taken ;)

Now to find the Jet Blue voucher...

Monday, September 3, 2007

re-reading

After all the singing, shouting, dancing, drinking songs (ahem), and general mayhem of the last three days, I spent a quiet couple of hours reading this am. (Very quiet, as neither my friend or myself have any voice left after the Gaelic Storm performance last nite!).

Read the first couple chapters of Michael Casey's "Sacred Reading: The Ancient Art of Lectio Divina."

This quote jumped out at me:

Repetition is the soul of genuine lectio. It is a right brain activity; we do not grasp the entire content immediately but in a circular manner. We read and advance, then we go back and read again.

Of course, Casey is talking about scripture, but it spoke to me also in a general sense. I'll give a very bad *g* example. In preparation for book seven of Harry Potter, I started re-reading the entire series from book one. By the time I got to the last book, all the backstory and continuity were firm in my mind, and it totally enhanced the experience and satisfaction of the ending

I have so many good books, and not just fiction, on my shelves that I've read only once. Authors like CS Lewis (is it possibly to read CS Lewis too much? I think not.), Thomas Merton, Kathleen Norris, Lauren Winner, and several others.

So I think for Advent and Lent I will read no new books, but re-read books that I already have. And possibly dust my bookshelves...

Sunday, September 2, 2007

Spamming with the memes...

You scored as Anselm, Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period.He sees man's primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read 'Cur Deus Homo?'

Anselm

93%

John Calvin

87%

Jonathan Edwards

73%

Martin Luther

73%

Friedrich Schleiermacher

60%

Karl Barth

53%

Paul Tillich

53%

Augustine

47%

Charles Finney

40%

J├╝rgen Moltmann

33%

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I'm not in Kansas anymore...

Actually I am. Or possibly Missouri. Am staying in Kansas City with my friend Kelly, and the state seems to change from block to block. Apparently I'm not the only one confused, as members of the band we are stalking listening to this weekend were having the same issues - yelling out Kansas and being corrected "Missouri!!"

We're attending all three days of the Kansas City Irish Festival, my feet are sore, and I have no voice :)

Check my LJ
for pictures, and a short video of me at the clogging workshop.
Kelly also has a short vid of Gaelic Storm - Pat Murphy doing his Snoop Dogg version of Johnny Tarr.
(Deeply Spiritual Gaelic Storm is not. But they are much fun. And my favorite band.) Aside from GS, which was the whole reason I came to KC (well that and to finally see Kelly), we saw the Young Dubliners, and the Elders, who also rock. Several CDs have been purchased.

We'll go back today, wearing our "Don't go for the one" teeshirts, for one last stalking performance, and tin whistle workshop. I'm not allowed to buy any more teeshirts, but am permitted another CD or two or three. *whistles innocently*